Dervla McTiernan – The Scholar

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Dervla McTiernan – The Scholar

When on a late evening scientist Emma finds a young woman dead on the university premises, it looks like a hit and run without any connection to the place. But then, the police find out that she had the ID of another student with her and also wore her clothes. Carline Darcy, first presumed the victim, reacts very harshly to the police showing up at her apartment, but her behaviour makes her even more suspicious, especially since Carline comes from a very rich family owning the institute close to which the body of the still unidentified woman was found. As Cormac Reilly and his team investigate, more and more evidence pops up linking the rich girl to the murder. But also the scientist who found the victim is doubtful – wasn’t she connected to another murder just a couple of months before? And what about the fact that Emma is the leading sergeant’s partner?

Dervla McTiernan’s thriller is a highly complex police investigation that I thoroughly enjoyed to read. It moves at a high pace and on every new page, new evidence appears that leads to another thread that you could follow. To fully understand to extent of the case, it takes some time and you as a reader investigate along the police all the time. The fact that sergeant Reilly himself is personally involved gives it all a bit of an extra that made the whole story even more interesting.

There are two aspects in the novel that I found wonderfully elaborated. First of all, the ways dysfunctional families find their own modus operandi in which they proceed and which can never be penetrated by somebody from outside. It was mainly in a side plot that this a deeply developed, but it was also true for the protagonist’s family, just with a slight shift of interest. The second was the question of how far people are willing to go for success and recognition. These are highly valued in our times and often the main feature to define a person. If you cannot compete, you are nothing. With this attitude, to we dig our own graves in putting people under so much pressure that they cannot see a way out?

All in all, very gripping and real page-turner.

Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott – Swan Song

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Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott – Swan Song

He has been one of the most fascinating writers of the last century, not only his works but also his private life offers much to talk about. Both are closely linked since he used the people around him as a source for his creative work. Kelleigh Greenberg-Jephcott retells Truman Capote‘s life as it might have been. From his first steps in writing as a boy – the chance to win a puppy was motivation enough to take part in a competition – to his well known novels „Breakfast at Tiffany’s“ and „In Cold Blood“. He had his charms, could easily win people for him, but then he misused their trust and confidence, played his games and made fun of the people who took him for a close friend.

The novel is lively told, the fact that Greenberg-Jephcott does not stick to the chronological order but springs back and forth in time adds to the liveliness. The dialogues are vivid and you get quite a good idea of how the people around Capote might have been, especially his mother and Babe. It is not a biography, but real life events taken and told a story out of the facts – just what Capote himself did. Also from a psychological point of view quite impressive.