Alison James – The Man She Married

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Alison James – The Man She Married

It is a pure coincidence that Alice makes the acquaintance of Dominic Gill. After her former fiancé had cancelled their wedding only days before it was supposed to take place, she didn’t really expect to meet anybody else to fall for. Dominic seems to be totally crazy asking her to marry him only weeks after they got to know each other, but why wait any longer if you feel it’s the right thing to do? Yet, there are some things they should have discussed before making the big step, e.g. do they want to have a baby, and it would have made sense to meet his mother and brother, but Alice does not worry too much about these things. Then one evening the police knock at her door and inform her about her husband’s death. When she comes to identify him, Dom’s brother is there insisting that the dead body does not belong to Dominic Gill. So who was Alice married to?

“The Man She Married” is a fast-paced thriller that shows how easily even intelligent and self-confident people may fall prey to fraudsters. As a reader, you are well aware of what is going on and at times, I got really annoyed with Alice’s mindlessness and naiveté, yet, I cannot say for sure that blinded by love I would assess Dom’s behaviour differently. With the main character’s sudden death, I wondered what else there was to come, but unexpectedly, Alison James made the hunt for Dominic’s real past as interesting as his deception of Alice.

Even though I have some doubts if it really is that easy to get fake identities or to take over somebody else’s life and to manage to keep up the facade of two lives simultaneously, I found it a gripping and spell-binding read.

Clare Clark – In the Full Light of the Sun

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Clare Clark – In the Full Light of the Sun

The 1920s are tough in post-war Germany, but the show must go on and the art market flourishes despite all economic struggles. Yet, where money can be made, fraudsters aren‘t far away. Julius is a Berlin based art dealer and specialist in van Gogh; Rachmann is a young Düsseldorf art expert who is hoping to make a career in the business, too; Emmeline is a talented artist and rebel. Since the art world is a small one, their paths necessarily cross and one of the biggest frauds in art links them.

I have been a lover of novels set in the 1920s and 1930s in Berlin since this was a most inspiring and interesting time of the town. Not just big politics after the loss in the first word war and then the rise of the Nazi party, but also the culture and entertainment industries were strong and the whole world looked at the German capital. Quite logically, Clare Clark‘s novel caught my interest immediately. However, I am a bit disappointed because the book couldn‘t live up to the high expectations.

I appreciate the idea of narrating the scandal from three different perspectives and points in time. The downside of this, however, was that the three parts never really merge into one novel but somehow remain standing next to each other linked only loosely. At the beginning, I really enjoyed the discussions about art and van Gogh‘s work, but this was given up too quickly and replaced with the characters‘ lamentations and their private problems which weren‘t that interesting at all and made reading the novel quite lengthy.